Hope Community Shelter Closes

Just last week C-Ville Weekly wrote about Josh Bare’s efforts to keep open the Hope Community Center homeless shelter, set up to take the place of COMPASS’ efforts. (I think it was last week. Mysteriously, C-Ville Weekly provides no dates for stories on their website. Or authors, so I can’t tell you who wrote it.) Accused of violating zoning regulations, the city told the shelter that they’d need to shut down unless they got an amendment to zoning regulations to accommodate them. Today Jayson Whitehead writes on C-Ville Weekly’s new blog that the shelter is shutting down, unable to comply with the fire code, with no path forward in their relations with the city, and facing increasingly unhappy neighbors. This will leave 45-60 regular residents without a place to sleep.

13 thoughts on “Hope Community Shelter Closes”

  1. Hey Waldo,

    c-ville.com archives in two ways: one of which, as you noted, doesn’t include the details of date and author (I’ll take care of that). Via a search, however, you can find the original article with that data, here for Jayson’s article on Josh Bare. It was published Tuesday, April 22.

    Personal note: On closing of the shelter, I’m disappointed.

  2. I live a few doors away from the shelter on 11th St. and I have volunteered there. The people I’ve met have been very respectful of the neighborhood and its residents as far as far as I have seen. I encourage the other residents of the neighborhood to go and talk to the people there, spend an hour there helping to serve dinner.

  3. This is more proof that the city cares about its image and money more than its people. Isn’t it funny that other cities do more than the #17th best ranked city? #17 for whom?

  4. Just to play devil’s advocate here. Isn’t it the responsibility of an organization to make sure that they are following the rules? If Hope wanted to have a shelter, it seems like they ought to have applied to the city to have one. Would have saved a lot of time and bad publicity.

  5. Back a few years ago before they built all those pastel colored Huja Houses nobody would have paid it any mind. But now that they’ve run off the crack dealers and planted some flowers all of a sudden it’s all gotta be “by the book”. Good thing it’s summertime. The old magnolia tree in Lee Park will have to do for now. Nothing like sleeping out under the stars.

  6. The impression I got was that the Bares were trying to help people who wanted to get back on their feet,who wanted to help themselves and overcome the problems that caused them to become homeless in the first place. Exactly the right approach. It was not just a place to “hang out.”
    I heard somewhere that in order to pass inspection a shelter had to be up to “hotel standards”. Who will the city go after next? The Shelter for Help in Emergency? Region 10 group homes? I expect many of them offer living conditions not quite up to “hotel standards”.
    If Josh Bare had been operating a firetrap, or if the shelter had been causing problems in the neighborhood that would have been one thing. But that did not seem to be the case. He just ran afoul of government bureacracy.
    Or maybe since our mayor is head of PACEM, he did not like to see someone else actually accomplishing something, while PACEM’s acclaimed “day shelter” never got off the ground.
    Add this to the list along with the YMCA park giveaway, the new ambulance system as another example of our arrogant out of touch,taxdollar wasteful La-La Land city government!

  7. LegatoGal, why should someone go over there, after they have worked all day long, and serve them dinner? Are the residents incapable of serving themselves? If that is so, then they must not be getting the jobs as have been claimed.
    I Made it #1 you made it 17th “This is more proof that the city cares about its image and money more than its people. Isn’t it funny that other cities do more than the #17th best ranked city?” Rev. Bare has stated on WINA that many of his clients have come from as far away as Richmond. Could you name the cities of around 40,000 pop. that do more for the homeless than Charlottesville?
    Outdoor Man “Back a few years ago before they built all those pastel colored Huja Houses nobody would have paid it any mind.” Not true, you’d better believe that the WCEH neighborhood would have been all over this, just as it is now.
    HollowBoy “I heard somewhere that in order to pass inspection a shelter had to be up to “hotel standards”. Who will the city go after next? The Shelter for Help in Emergency? Region 10 group homes? I expect many of them offer living conditions not quite up to “hotel standards”.” This is absolutely and totally untrue and is insulting to those agencies. The Salvation Army has had to spend millions o dollars keeping its shelter on Ridge Street up to the ever-changing code since the sixties. Every house that SHE has occupied since its inception has had to be up to code and has had limits on the number of occupants. Region Ten has spent millions on its facilities and actively monitors the housing conditions of its clients who are in private rentals.
    It’s interesting that the reason zoning was employed in the first place was because of the unhealthy living conditions that were prevalent in urban tenements. Laws were enacted to require property owners to have windows for air and light, to require a certain square footage for each tenant to combat tuberculosis, to provide sufficient fire evaluation routes for timely escape, and eventually suffiecient indoor plumbing. I’m wondering if some of the bloggers here think that these people don’t deserve the same consideration.

  8. Cville Eye, though some of us DO have jobs, that’s not the point. We are fully capable of serving ourselves, but that is not how it is done. Since you seems to know so much about the way these places are operated, then I am sure you know, like at a cafeteria, you stand in line and wait your turn to pick out what you want to eat. The Hope Center is no different. During the recent storm, the Hope Center offered its space to people who needed shelter that were not necessarily homeless. Does this grand city even have an emergency shelter in case of disasters of any sort?

  9. Afterthought – The Hope Community Center is NOT closing down, the only thing that is changing is the we will not be allowed to stay there at night. The afternoon daycare, the yoga classes, etc will continue. Where the elderly, handicapped, families and other homeless people that stay at the Center will go is unknown. Take care, and have a happy Mother’s Day.

  10. Street, no where did I say that no homeless person has a job. Go back and re-read. At Thanksgiving and Christmas, volunteers come out and serve the clients at the Salvation Army. The rest of the year, the residents and walk-ins serve themselves, even if they have worked all day. Most, if not all, of the area soup kitchens operate on a line basis and everybody leaves after three hours.
    No, the city does not operate a year-round emergency shelter in case of inclement weather, nor does any surrounding county. The emergency shelters are opened in each locality as needed.
    I hope not only will you have a lovely Mother’s Day, but also, a rich and rewarding life. But you won’t be getting it by my serving you your food.

  11. I don’t want you to serve me. I’d much rather serve myself. A couple people have offered to donate entire buildings to us, but whether this comes to fruition or not is entirely another matter. I will keep you all posted on further developments, if you wish. This is not over by any stretch of the imagination. Have a wonderful day! :)

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