Lowest Unemployment in the Nation

Charlottesville has tied for third place with the lowest unemployment rate in the nation in an analysis of November employment data. We’re at 2.1%, with Fargo, ND (1.7%) and Logan, UT (2%) coming in ahead of us. We tied with Billings, MT.

13 Responses to “Lowest Unemployment in the Nation”


  • Then I must be doing something wrong. I hate stories like these.

  • Considering the 323 jobs currently listed at UVA, it’s not all that surprising to have such a low unemployment rate.

    Granted, it takes forever and a day to go through the UVA employment process, but that’s still a lot of jobs to be had in a wide range of professions.

  • Now I’d like to know where we stand on underemployment…

  • Time to move to Fargo.

  • So why does the Chamber and the TJ Partnership for Econ. Development keep telling us we need more jobs?…..

  • So why does the Chamber and the TJ Partnership for Econ. Development keep telling us we need more jobs?…..

    Because most of the Jobs that are available (if they don’t have a lot of competition) are not ones that an individual can support or raise a family on. They aren’t “career ladder” jobs.

  • Kempis
    The rhetoric of this regions “underemployment” is totally unproven. I’m tired of hearing how many phd’s in town have to wait tables….are we supposed to create jobs for people who simply won’t move to another town to find a job. Every other major university town has the same issue…..the unemployment numbers speak for themselves.

  • I don’t think there would be a study that you would believe. I don’t know any PhD’s waiting tables. Why would someone get a Ph.D. and plan to stay in Cville. It is a false example.

    What is being suggested is that the pay reflect the cost of living in the area. That when looking to bring new commerce to the area one looks for commerce that will bring jobs to the economy that are more than just the retail and service industry. It’s called planning. It helps with economic health. That’s hardly “creating jobs for people who simply won’t move to another town to find a job.” Which in many instances isn’t really a practical solution to begin with.

    In my opinion, the unemployment numbers are bullshit. They don’t reflect reality.

  • Kempis I agree with you. Whether people admit it or not sprawl, underemployment, transportation and development are all linked. If the jobs in town paid enough people wouldn’t be forced to move so far out creating sprawl in our rural counties. The county and city need to do a better job of courting high paying jobs. Almost fifty percent of county residents and forty percent of city residents have a undergraduate degree or higher. I have a hard time believing that their pay matches their education. If people were being paid sufficiently I believe sprawl would slow down in the rural counties and focus closer to town. This would mean a more dense population distribution around town but it would also mean that public transportation and walking would be a more viable alternative.

  • Kempis
    I’m not sure what study you’re refering to. Certainly there hasn’t been a study of “underemployment” in this community that has any serious statistical merit. If unemployment numbers are BS, why would most economists continue to use it as a barometer of economic health…besides desirable places to live are inevitably more expensive. Cville is down right affordable compared to many other places in the northeast, midwest and westcoast.

    “when looking to bring new commerce to the area one looks for commerce that will bring jobs to the economy that are more than just the retail and service industry.”….Then why do our Econ. Dev. leaders (Chamber, TJPED) seem to bend over backwards in support of huge new retail/residential projects such as Hollymead TC and North Pointe(y)? Oh that’s right….we’re trying to become NOVA.

    Your arguement makes no sense at all.

  • Cville is down right affordable compared to many other places in the northeast, midwest and westcoast.

    I think that would depend on how much you make. If you’re well off then yeah Cville’s a better deal. If you’re not there isn’t much difference. I’ve lived most of those places. With the exception of the rental market (and some of those in Cville are as pricey), If you’re living close to or in Charlottesville the differences are slight compared to those other areas you mention.

    I’m not sure what study you’re refering to.

    I think you know exactly the point I was trying to make. But for clarification:

    The rhetoric of this regions “underemployment” is totally unproven.

    I don’t think there would be something that could prove it to you. Be it a study or whatever…

    Then why do our Econ. Dev. leaders (Chamber, TJPED) seem to bend over backwards in support of huge new retail/residential projects such as Hollymead TC and North Pointe?

    Because they don’t practice what they preach.

  • I think that the number given as the percentage of unemployed is actually the percentage of the population that have applied or are receiving unemployment benefits. The number does not accurately represent the full picture since not everyone that is unemployed has applied for or is receiving unemployment benefits, especially in a college town.

    There are plenty of spouses who are not working but would like to if there were decent jobs available. I know of spouses of working, non-citizens who have work permits but they still cannot find decent jobs here in Charlottesville.

    Is unemployment compensation available to non-citizens? I don’t think it is but I don’t know.

  • From cvillity:

    Cville is down right affordable compared to many other places in the northeast, midwest and westcoast.

    If you are just comparing the rent of a 2-BR apartment or the cost of a 1,400 sq. foot house, then yes, Cville is cheaper than D.C., N.Y., and a hundred other big cities. But you fail to factor in average income.

    According to PayScale, the average salary for a legal secretary in DC is $57,100, and the average rent of a 1-BR apt. is $1,400, so only 29.4% of a secretary’s monthly income goes toward housing. In Charlottesville, the same secretary averages $25,000/year and the median 1-BR. rent is $700, or 33.6% of monthly income.

    Ergo, the cost of living is higher here than in DC.

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