Parties Nominate Council Candidates

For the first time in years, there’s nothing new in the City Council race, despite the pair of nomination conventions this weekend. On Saturday, Democrats nominated the only two candidates for both seats that are up (Rob Schilling’s and Blake Caravati’s), John Yellig wrote in yesterday’s Progress, and on Sunday, Republicans nominated incumbent Schilling, their only candidate, Liesel Nowak writes in today’s Progress. Conventional wisdom holds that Schilling’s best shot at reelection is to run alone, so as to be many people’s second choice, rather than having that diluted with another Republican.

Charlottesville Tomorrow provides the audio for the entirety of the Democratic convention and the Republican convention, while Rick Sincere provides a report from the Republican convention. And, as long as I’m providing audio, the musical stylings of Rob Schilling are available on his CD Baby page.

From here the general election begins, leading up to the May 2 election.

4 Responses to “Parties Nominate Council Candidates”


  • I have always been a Democrat. But in this Council election, barring unforseen events, I will be casting my vote for Rob Schilling. He may not yet have a solution, but he at least recognizes the problem. The problem being the financial squeeze city residents are being put in, paying more for services and receiving fewer, ever increasing assessments on our homes.
    I see no mention of this problem by the Democratic candidates. Some of their proposals sound like robbing Peter to pay Paul. Lots of noble-sounding platitudes like “promote health and wellness.”
    Would anyone run on a platform of promoting sickness. If it had said we need to address the problem of working people without health insurance, that would have actually said something concrete.
    It seems like the city wants its residents to be well-paid single professionals or wealthy retirees who will live in townhouses or condos off the West Main Street corridor.Forget about families with kids, the middle class, etc- we don’t need them.
    Why is it the city talks of a budget crunch and yet goes ahead with things like a “transit center” which I have yet to see how it will expand the use of public transit. They approve the Great White Eyesore at the Mall’s east end, and then have to figure about what to do about the loss of a crossing by City Hall. Opening up another crossing will cost money.
    The problem with our city government is that they actually believe that “world-class city” hype and don’t see what is really happening to people.
    I hope voters get “Mad as Hell” and refuse to take it anymore. I have issues with the Republican Party, but the present Democratic clique in charge of our government has been found wanting.

  • The only report so far from someone who observed both conventions:

    Nominated: 3 whites for 2 seats: First black mayor calls for racial quota on Council” March 5, 2006

  • Hollow Boy wrote:

    It seems like the city wants its residents to be well-paid single professionals or wealthy retirees who will live in townhouses or condos off the West Main Street corridor. Forget about families with kids, the middle class, etc- we don’t need them.

    Why is it the city talks of a budget crunch and yet goes ahead with things like a ‘transit center’ which I have yet to see how it will expand the use of public transit. They approve the Great White Eyesore at the Mall’s east end, and then have to figure about what to do about the loss of a crossing by City Hall. Opening up another crossing will cost money.

    The problem with our city government is that they actually believe that ‘world-class city’ hype and don’t see what is really happening to people.

    I hope voters get ‘Mad as Hell’ and refuse to take it anymore.

    Couldn’t have said it better myself. :-)

    p.s. I agree, if a candidate simply says we should “promote health and wellness,” I too would dismiss that as a vacuous throw-away line. But if a candidate says (as I do) that we should promote health and wellness by, for example, “expanding access to quality health care in low-income neighborhoods” (which I’ve been working to do as chair of the Westhaven Nursing Clinic Coalition the past couple of years), that to me is not only a concrete and achievable goal, but a pretty important one for our community to pursue.

  • If Mr Schilling were to lose, I would propose that the Council appoint him to an honorary position of Council Jester. I have enjoyed Mr Schillings behavior during his term, though I would be at a loss to name one single positive accomplishment he has made, a record he has in common with Delegate Bell.

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