Cav. Daily Columnist Caught Plagiarizing

A correction in yesterday’s Cavalier Daily indicates that a student got caught plagiarizing from another publication. No details are provided — presumably a note from the editor will be appearing before long — other than that a December 2 column “‘Browser Wars: A New Hope’ used a significant amount of ideas and conclusions without attribution from a Dec. 15 PCWorld column.” (The date different results from PC World columns being available on the website prior to publication in the magazine.) The column is not on the Cavalier Daily’s website. This is, of course, a clear violation of the honor code.

This last happened in late 2003, when two separate writers were discovered to have plagiarized from several different high-profile publications. If those two girls were ever brought before the honor committee, I can’t find any record of it. It will be interesting to find out what happens in this instance.

7 Responses to “Cav. Daily Columnist Caught Plagiarizing”


  • funny how 2 days ago, you were giving the CD props.

  • and they still deserve it today – this plagiarism is not the same writer.

  • It’s almost like the world isn’t black and white. It’s as if there are shades of gray and even dualities within complexities.

    One could nearly think that, anyhow.

  • Funny how two days ago, you were giving the Cavalier Daily props.

    oops…busted.

  • Would this qualify as a “serious” offense under their “honor code”?

  • The CD retraction reads:

    The Cavalier Daily has discovered that the Dec. 2 Science column, “Browser Wars: A New Hope” used a significant amount of ideas and conclusions without attribution from a Dec. 15 PCWorld column, “Browser Wars,” by Michael Desmond.The Cavalier Daily is retracting the column and apologizes to its readers for publishing the piece. The similar headline is a mere coincidence because the writer of the headline never read the PCWorld column.

    Okay does someone other than the article’s Author write the headlines? Because otherwise I can’t see how one can draw ideas and conclusions from an article one has never read.

    As far as the honor code violation goes, I have a suspicion (one that is entirely without proof) that the honor code is selectively enforced.

  • Okay does someone other than the article’s Author write the headlines?

    Headlines are generally written by the editor or somebody on the editorial staff. To anybody who doesn’t know that — that is, most people — that’s pretty confusing.

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