Albemarle Schools to Increase Pay Raise

Due to increased property tax values in Albemarle County, the school system is receiving about $886,000 more than they had expected. The school board is proposing that this money be used to increase the size of the planned pay increase from 2% to 3% – 3.3%. The total increased income from taxes is $1.3M, but the county is getting $440,000 less from the state, so the balance comes to that $886,000 excess. Kate Andrews has the story in today’s Progress.

11 thoughts on “Albemarle Schools to Increase Pay Raise”

  1. they also tallking about covering 100% of all medical insurance increase, about $800 per person. I curious how many people not in goverment have to pay 0% for their medical insurace.

  2. Awesome! It’s good to see a school using excess funds to increase teachers’ alarmingly low salaries. Considering that they have one of the most important roles in a child’s development, it’s amazing that we don’t pay them better than we do. The extraordinarily high turnover rate of teachers in both the city and county schools is evidence of this. Props to the county for taking that initiative.

  3. sorry will, starting salary is 30k all benefits including retirement are paid for by the county. Turnover is nearly non-existant. Albemarle school has a lower turnover rate than UVA and most local large business. If you doubt this try and get a job as a teacher in Albemarle.

    You maded up the turnover rate and you have no evidence. The props extend to the taxpayers for picking up the tab and the teacher for doing the work. It ain’t a sweapshop and they aren’t victims.

  4. I operate a small business in Charlottesville, with just four full-time employees. We pay 100% of all medical insurance costs for all employees and their families.

  5. I’m afraid that my turnover statement wasn’t made up, and here’s proof to back it up (click the links for their source):

    Albemarle County had approximately 170 teaching vacancies last year

    Then, from the County Schools’ site:
    there are approximately 1,165 professional instructional personnel

    That’s a 15% turnover rate, which is quite high. Hardly non-existant! I’m not sure whether “teaching vacancies” refers to all “professional instructional personnel” or whether it’s just some of them, whereupon that turnover rate could be even higher.

    In addition, it is indeed quite easy to get a teaching job at the Albemarle County Schools right now because of national teacher shortage that the Albemarle County schools are being hit quite hard by.

    And to address your only remaining point, even the school superintedent isn’t happy with teacher’s salaries: he wants it raised by at least 33% over the next three years.

  6. Get to know a teacher and then find out how many hours they actually put into their work week – especially in a quality system such as Albemarle County. Then figure in all the money that they spend out of pocket on expenses and then come up with the real figure for their hourly rate. Oh, and you could also factor in some of the intagibles, like dealing with parents who want to make a big deal about something like the stuffed animals not being moved around in the library on a regular basis. Believe me, they are underpaid.

  7. 1.The increase in Albemarle was dramatic from previous years. But tsk tsk, less vacancies in Charlottesville when you know it has many less teachers, the site you mention shows that there are 400 teachers. Infact the percentage of dropout is higher in the city. And not all those 170 were actual teaching positons. A fact you do mention. Some of the vacancies where Reduction in Force that came because the student population DECREASED in the last four years. That would mean not as many teachers are needed.

    2. 15% is high for one year and if it’s a trend it’s troublng. But compared to what? the average over the last few years around 5% to 7%. The dropout rate for teachers in the first three years is about 50% natonal, not unlike many other professions. I notice you use a Charlottesville website to talk about Albemarle -because the information about Albemarle is nearly impossible to find.

    3. The national teaching shortage is a myth for places like Albemarle and Charlottesville. The shortage, even according to some teaching website, is only criticial in urban, poor metro areas. We will continue to turn down many times applications then we accept. Some years it has been ten-to-one.

    4.The article you quote is two years old. Starting salaries in Albemarle, when you include the benefit package, are within a couple of dollars of Charlottesville.

    5. I want to pay teachers a fair wage. Let argue what fair is. How much will we have to raise taxes to get there?

  8. As a salaried person I take home work all the time. I am tired of hearing how hard teachers work. These days everybody works hard. Give me the same hours of work and I would notice no difference. But I will take the 2 1/2 months off a year and the generous benefit package. I know teacher, they are no better or worst the most people. They are better paid then social workers and lots of other people in this town with college degrees. And talk about job security- try and fire a bad teacher. They will tie you up in court for months, even years.

    Bottom line the marketplace sets salaries. And teacher have done alot of this to themselves. Why for example don’t we pay math and science teachers more because there is a shortage of these skills. According to the NEA you must raise all teachers salaries to the same level based only on years of service. In business when computer skill are in short supply then people with those skills make more money.

    If M&S teachers were paid more, more would choice to teach math and science. Then the shortage would be solved. Radical economics for sure

  9. If a teacher is working unpaid/unapproved overtime and not being compensated I would suggest contacting the Wage and Hour Board @

    http://www.dol.gov/dol/esa/public/whd_org.htm

    >>Get to know a teacher and then find out how many hours they actually put into their work week

    >>Then figure in all the money that they spend out of pocket on expenses and then come up with the real figure for their hourly rate.

    I know several teachers and they are all extremely dedicated to their jobs.

    These all sound like personal, individual decisions to me. If you are being forced (duress)to work more hours than you are compensated I would suggest finding another occupation.

    What do you consider “out of pocket” expenses? Like gas to and from work? Or are you being forced to fund scholastic programs? Unless someone put a gun to your head while you drafted the check, it was free will.

  10. “These all sound like personal, individual decisions to me. If you are being forced (duress)to work more hours than you are compensated I would suggest finding another occupation. ”

    And teachers are exempt from this concept in what way?

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